Talking Movies

March 18, 2019

Filed under: Uncategorized — Fergal Casey @ 10:00 pm

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Filed under: Uncategorized — Fergal Casey @ 10:00 pm

Filed under: Uncategorized — Fergal Casey @ 9:59 pm

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March 10, 2019

Notes on Fighting with my Family

Fighting with my Family was the catch-up film of the week much earlier today on Sunday Breakfast with Patrick Doyle.

Stephen Merchant is the decidedly unlikely writer/director of this sports comedy-drama about the cheesy world of wrestling, which is fixed not fake as Nick Frost is quick to point out. Frost and Lena Headey are the proprietors of World Association of Wrestling, based in Norwich, but their children Florence Pugh and Jack Lowden have the chance to hit the big-time when they try out for the WWE during a London event. But coach Vince Vaughn only takes Pugh with him to Florida for SEAL/NXT training. As the Goth Pugh struggles with the talentless bikini babes being more popular than her with the wrestling audience the embittered Lowden spirals into drink and rage back home. And that is where Merchant’s name on proceedings becomes curious. A wonderful dinner party where Frost and Headey try and fail to impress the classy parents (Merchant and Julia Davis) of Lowden’s girlfriend is pure Merchant, but then the sports drama surrounding such sequences is a familiar tale differentiated only by the theatrical nature of the sport depicted in training montages.

Listen here:

March 9, 2019

Filed under: Uncategorized — Fergal Casey @ 12:55 pm

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The Prodigy: 10 Songs

Filed under: Talking Music — Fergal Casey @ 12:55 pm

Everybody in the Place

Out of Space

No Good (Start the Dance)

Voodoo People

Poison

Firestarter

Breathe

Smack My Bitch Up

Climbatize

Invaders Must Die

March 3, 2019

Notes on The Aftermath

Filed under: Talking Movies — Fergal Casey @ 8:13 pm

Keira Knightley’s new post-war romance was the film of the week much earlier today on Sunday Breakfast with Patrick Doyle.

The Aftermath seems to be attempting to surf on the eddies left by Atonement, but this is a far more muted drama, and its startlingly more explicit affair comes out of nowhere. Indeed one imagines that pages 55 and 75 has been stapled in reverse order in the shooting script. Knightley’s character lost her son in the Blitz, Alexander Skarsgaard lost his wife in the firebombing of Hamburg. Yet there is no reason for her jumping from ‘I hate the Germans, they killed my son’ to jumping Skarsgaard. But if only it had come after the film’s best scene, where Knightley plays the piano. The first time she has properly played since her son died, using the copy of Debussy’s Claire de Lune inscribed by Skarsgaard’s dead wife. As Skarsgaard’s daughter joins in, and all are then reduced to tears by Knightley’s broken monologue about her dead son Skarsgaard sits down to comfort her. That scene should precede their affair…

Listen here:

Filed under: Uncategorized — Fergal Casey @ 7:50 pm

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February 28, 2019

Nirvana: 10 Songs

About a Girl

Smells Like Teen Spirit

Come As You Are

Lithium

On a Plain

Scentless Apprentice

Heart-Shaped Box

Dumb

All Apologies

You Know You’re Right

Any Other Business: Part XXVI

Filed under: Talking Television — Fergal Casey @ 4:04 pm

What is one to do with thoughts that are far too long for Twitter but not nearly long enough for a blog post proper? Why round them up and turn them into a twenty-sixth pormanteau post on matters of course!

Is this about Brexit?

Two commercials keep catching my eye on television at the moment, and both seem to be about Brexit without saying they’re about Brexit. One seems to be an implicit rebuke to the Little Englanders by playing Elgar’s Nimrod Enigma Variation over Richard Ayoade reminding everyone how hopelessly connected with and dependent on the rest of the world the small island is, while the other appropriately enough features recent Churchill impersonator Gary Oldman in a spirit of ‘keep buggering on’ as it attempts to cheer up the British that they have done good things in the past and so might survive this folly.

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